History

1908

The YWCA was founded January 19, 1908

The organization was founded by churchwomen in the community to help girls coming into the city to work for Reynolds Tobacco Company and Hanes Knitting Company. The building originally was downtown on Main Street. Girls were taught stenography, typing, arithmetic, English, cooking, sewing and millinery.

1909

Funded member of the Community Chest

The YWCA became a funded member of the Community Chest, now known as the United Way.

1916

First Lunchroom

YWCA opened first lunchroom.

1917

Opened its First Pool

YWCA opened its first pool. A new building was built at the corner of Church and W. First Streets, with clubrooms, dormitory and gym.

1918

YW was established to meet the needs of African-American Women

A branch YW was established to meet the needs of African-American women. More African-American women were employed by Reynolds than White. The Branch YW served as the first community center for African-Americans in Winston. It housed, at various times, the Better Homes and Gardens Clubs, the Work Project Administration, the Well Baby Clinic and the Carolina Fair Association Committee (run for African Americans.) Horton Branch Library was organized and housed in the Chestnut Street YWCA building.

1930

YWCA hosted a debate between the Younger Business Girls’ Club and the Business and Professional Women’s Club

The YWCA hosted a debate between the Younger Business Girls’ Club and the Business and Professional Women’s Club. The debate topic was “Should a woman whose husband earns $100 or more a month be allowed to work?” (The Younger Business Girls won supporting the notion that they should not be allowed to work.)

The Chestnut Street YWCA held a Christmas party and provided gifts for 2,000 African-American children.

The YWCA employed women and girls to make rag rugs during the Depression.

1931

Lowered the maximum work week to 55 hours

Mrs. Bryan Booe headed a YWCA committee that worked with local stores to lower the maximum work week to 55 hours and to place stools behind the counters for clerks.

1932

Established Camp Betty Hastings

The YWCA accepted land from Fred Hutchins to establish Camp Betty Hastings named for the camp director.

1942

The Glade Street building was dedicated.

The Glade Street building was dedicated.

1949

Combined Negro YWCA and YWCA building

The Campaign begins to raise funds to construct a combined Negro YWCA and YWCA building. The building would be the only community in Winston-Salem for African-Americans. Leaders of the campaign said the building would be used for religious purposes and that it would be an important development in race relations. RJR Tobacco Company gave $200,000. The building was shared by the YWCA and the YMCA, but they operated separately, with different staffs and programs.

1953

The Negro YWCA-YMCA at Patterson Avenue opened

The Negro YWCA-YMCA at Patterson Avenue opened with a gym and swimming pool. Classes for young women included crafts, cooking and other topics.

1956

Dedicated the Patterson Avenue Swimming Pool

The Patterson Avenue swimming pool was dedicated.

1957

Glade St. Pool and Gym Opened

The gym and pool at Glade Street opened.

1969

Program for Marching Bands Begins

The Marching Bands program begins.

1974

Glade Street and Patterson Branches Merge

The YWCA Board of Directors votes to merge the Glade Street and Patterson branches to create one YWCA for all women.

1976

First African-American Executive Director

Martha Young became the first African-American executive director of the Glade Street YWCA.

1981

Kick off of campaign for Link Building between the pool/gym and administrative buildings

Kick off of campaign for Link Building between the pool/gym and administrative buildings.

1983

Project New Start Begins

Project New Start, a program for previously incarcerated women or spouses of incarcerated individuals begins.

1984

Link Building dedicated.

1992

The Empowering Family Center opens on Liberty Street

The Empowering Family Center opens on Liberty Street with the focus on helping parents become role models for their children. Presidential candidate Bill Clinton hosts a town meeting at the YWCA.

1997

New addition to the YWCA opens

New addition to the YWCA opens and includes the Chrissy Gallaher warm water pool and a new fitness center.

1998

Joel A. Weston Award for Excellence Received

The YWCA receives the Joel A. Weston Award for Excellence in Non-Profit management.

The Hawley House, previously a freestanding United Way agency, comes under YWCA management and is a new program of the YWCA.

2000

Created the Millennium Village

Created the Millennium Village to promote racial dialogue among women of diverse backgrounds and race.

2002

The Best Choice Center becomes a new program of the YWCA

The Best Choice Center, previously a freestanding United Way agency, becomes a new program of the YWCA.

2004

Right Turns for Youth Begins

Right Turns for Youth, previously a freestanding United Way agency, becomes a new program of the YWCA.

2007

The YWCA opened its Gateway Branch on South Main Street

The YWCA opened its Gateway Branch on South Main Street

2011

Leadership within the Community Continues

Continue to be a leader in the community by providing programs such as Supportive Services for women at the Hawley House, Youth Intervention Programs, Child Care for everyone, building healthier communities and impacting families through various activities.